Category: document

Treaty of Ghent: 24 December 1814

A historic painting depicting the signing of the Treaty of Ghent, with American and British delegates in discussion in a finely decorated room.

Treaty of Ghent: 24 December 1814 This “Treaty of Peace and Amity Between the United States and Great Britain” was signed on December 24, 1814. It ended the War of 1812, fought between Great Britain and the United States. Great Britain agreed to relinquish claims to the Northwest Territory, and both countries pledged to work

Report and Resolutions of the Hartford Convention: 04 January 1815

A political cartoon from 1814 illustrating figures contemplating a leap off a cliff, with one figure in regal attire eagerly waiting below.

Hartford Convention: Report and Resolutions, 04 January 1815 The Hartford Convention was a series of meetings from December 15, 1814, to January 5, 1815, in Hartford, Connecticut, United States, in which New England leaders of the Federalist Party met to discuss their grievances concerning the ongoing War of 1812 and the political problems arising from

Dolley Madison – Letter to Her Sister, Lucy Todd: 23 August 1814

A painting depicting First Lady Dolley Madison directing the removal of Gilbert Stuart's portrait of George Washington from the White House during the War of 1812.

Dolley Madison: Letter to Her Sister, Lucy Todd, 23 August 1814 On August 23, 1814, from the White House, Dolley Madison penned a letter to her sister Lucy Todd, detailing her plans to evacuate Washington, D.C., amid the War of 1812. While the original letter is missing, Madison provided this copy to her biographer, Margaret

From Thomas Jefferson to John Bacon: 30 April 1803

Founding Father Thomas Jefferson

From James Madison to Charles Pinckney, 27 November 1802 In this letter from James Madison to Charles Pinckney, Madison discusses the challenges faced in interactions with the Spanish Government, particularly regarding the violation of the Treaty of 1795. Madison emphasizes the significant implications this has on the Western citizens of the U.S., given the crucial

From James Madison to Charles Pinckney: November 27, 1802

Oil painting portrait of James Madison against a dark background, depicted in a pale coat with a white cravat.

From James Madison to Charles Pinckney, 27 November 1802 In this letter from James Madison to Charles Pinckney, Madison discusses the challenges faced in interactions with the Spanish Government, particularly regarding the violation of the Treaty of 1795. Madison emphasizes the significant implications this has on the Western citizens of the U.S., given the crucial

Louisiana Purchase Treaty: April 30, 1803

Painting depicting Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, and Robert R. Livingston discussing the Louisiana Purchase treaty.

Louisiana Purchase Treaty: April 30, 1803 The Louisiana Purchase, one of the most momentous land deals in U.S. history, took place in 1803 when the United States acquired approximately 828,000 square miles of territory from France. This vast region, stretching from the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains, doubled the size of the nation and

President Thomas Jefferson: First Inaugural Address, March 4, 1801

President Thomas Jefferson

President Thomas Jefferson: First Inaugural Address In Thomas Jefferson’s First Inaugural Address, delivered in Washington D.C. on March 4, 1801, he addresses the American citizenry as the newly elected third President of the United States. Jefferson conveys a profound sense of humility and acknowledges the tremendous responsibility placed upon him. He acknowledges the diversity of

Francis Scott Key: The Defence of Fort McHenry, 1814

Historical depiction of the bombardment of Fort McHenry with British naval ships in the background and cannon fire arcs in the sky.

The Defense of Fort McHenry (The Star-Spangled Banner) During the War of 1812, a noted attorney named Francis Scott Key found himself in the midst of the British onslaught against Fort McHenry in Baltimore Harbor. After enduring nearly a full day of relentless shelling, Key was certain the British would capture the fort and raise the

Woodrow Wilson: Fourteen Points for World Peace, 1918

President Woodrow Wilson in a top hat standing in front of World War I soldiers in uniform.

During a pivotal speech to Congress in January 1918, President Woodrow Wilson outlined fourteen essential tenets aimed at establishing worldwide peace. These principles subsequently shaped the peace talks held in Versailles, France, marking the conclusion of World War I. President Woodrow Wilson Fourteen Points for World Peace January 8, 1918 It will be our wish

Ronald Reagan: Address at Moscow State University, May 31, 1988

Main tower of Moscow State University with blue sky and clouds in the background.

As the 1980s drew to a close, the Cold War was winding down and the Soviet Union was on the brink of collapse. Diplomatic ties between the United States and the Soviet Union strengthened. The camaraderie between President Mikhail Gorbachev and President Ronald Reagan was notably cordial, leading to President Reagan’s memorable address to the