Category: Big Picture

The Negro Leagues from THE BIG PICTURE

THE BIG PICTURE | The Negro Leagues

Long before Jackie Robinson button-up his Dodger blues, baseball’s historic Negro Leagues was thrilling fans and breaking down barriers to racial integration. Celebrate the opening of MLB’s 2018 season with this inspiring selection from our video collection, THE BIG PICTURE!           Would you like unrestricted access to our full catalog? Streaming

Migrant Mother, Dorothea Lange (1936)

Migrant Mother, Dorothea Lange (1936)

Migrant Mother Dorothea Lange (1836) Migrant Mother, Dorothea Lange (1936) The Great Depression was especially hard on farmers. They not only suffered through the national economic crisis but endured a string of natural disasters, including floods and dust storms that devastated their crops and destroyed their livelihoods. Thousands of poverty-stricken families migrated to the agricultural

Looking Down Yosemite Valley, California, Albert Bierstadt (1865)

Looking Down Yosemite Valley, California, Albert Bierstadt (1865)

Looking Down Yosemite Valley, California Albert Bierstadt (1865) Looking Down Yosemite Valley, California, Albert Bierstadt (1865) In a time when few Americans In a time when few Americans had ventured west of the Mississippi, Looking Down Yosemite Valley, California offered a welcome view of one of the natural wonders on the far side of the

Cover Illustration for The Last of the Mohicans, 1919

Cover Illustration for The Last of the Mohicans, N.C. Wyeth (1919)

Cover Illustration for The Last of the Mohicans, N.C. Wyeth (1919) The Last of the Mohicans, an American adventure tale by James Fenimore Cooper, became an instant best-seller when it was published in 1826. Its popularity continued, and by 1919, when N. C. Wyeth illustrated a new, deluxe edition of the book, Cooper’s story had

George Washington (Lansdowne Portrait), Gilbert Stuart (1796)

George Washington (Lansdowne Portrait), Gilbert Stuart (1796 )

George Washington (Lansdowne Portrait), Gilbert Stuart (1796 ) Although George Washington sat for the most prominent artists of his day, Gilbert Stuart’s images of the first president and hero of the American Revolution have been so widely reproduced that it is almost impossible for Americans to conceive of Washington in any other way. Less than

Catlin Painting the Portrait of Mah-to-toh-pa—Mandan, George Catlin (1861/1869)

Catlin Painting the Portrait of Mah-to-toh-pa—Mandan, George Catlin (1861/1869)

Catlin Painting the Portrait of Mah-to-toh-pa—Mandan, George Catlin (1861/1869) “There is occasionally a chief or warrior of such extraordinary renown, that he is allowed to wear horns on his head-dress.… The reader will see this custom exemplified in the portrait of Mah-to-toh-pa…. [He is] the only man in the nation who was allowed to wear

View from Mount Holyoke (The Oxbow), Thomas Cole (1836)

View from Mount Holyoke (The Oxbow), Thomas Cole (1836)

View from Mount Holyoke (The Oxbow), Thomas Cole (1836) “The imagination can scarcely conceive Arcadian vales more lovely or more peaceful than the valley of the Connecticut,” wrote the artist Thomas Cole in his “Essay on American Scenery.” “Its villages are rural places where trees overspread every dwelling, and the fields upon its margin have

American Flamingo, John James Audubon (1838)

American Flamingo, John James Audubon (1838)

American Flamingo, John James Audubon (1838) American Flamingo is one of the 435 hand-colored engravings that make up John James Audubon’s monumental Birds of America, issued in four volumes between 1826 and 1838. The massive publication includes life-size representations of nearly five hundred species of North American birds. Although Audubon was not the first to

County Election, George Caleb Bingham (1852)

County Election, George Caleb Bingham (1852)

County Election, George Caleb Bingham (1852) The County Election pictures the American democratic system in progress. The story takes place in a small Midwestern town in the mid-nineteenth century, when the rituals of voting were still taking shape, particularly on the frontier. George Caleb Bingham, known as “the Missouri artist” for the state where he

Scroll Up