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Missouri Compromise

Map of Free and Slave States

Missouri Compromise Washington DC 06 March 1820 With the purchase of the Louisiana Territory and the application of Missouri for statehood, the long-standing balance between the number of slave states and the number of free states would be changed. Controversy arose within Congress over the issue of slavery. Congress adopted this legislation and admitted Missouri

John L. O’Sullivan on Manifest Destiny

Triplett's March of Destiny

John L. O’Sullivan on Manifest Destiny New York, NY November 1839 In 1839, John L. O’Sullivan, editor of the Democratic Review, referred in his magazine to America’s “manifest destiny to overspread the continent allotted by Providence for the free development of our yearly multiplying millions.” During O’Sullivan’s day, aggressive nationalists invoked manifest destiny to justify

Marshall Plan

Marshall Plan

Marshall Plan Washington DC 03 April 1948 In the immediate post-World War II period, Europe remained ravaged by war and thus susceptible to exploitation by both internal and external communist threats. In a June 5, 1947, speech to the graduating class at Harvard University, Secretary of State George C. Marshall issued a call for a

Brown v. Board of Education

Brown v. Board of Education telegram

Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka Supreme Court of the United States Washington DC 17 May 1954 The Louisiana Purchase has been described as the greatest real estate deal in history. In 1803 the United States paid France $15 million for the Louisiana Territory—some 828,000 square miles of land west of the Mississippi River.

Monroe Doctrine

A caricature of England and Germany responding to the Venezuelan Blockade.

Monroe Doctrine President James Monroe Washington DC 02 December 1823 The Monroe Doctrine was enunciated by President James Monroe in his annual message to Congress on the state of the union. “American continents…are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers…” At the time, the influence of Spain, France,

Civil Rights Act (1964)

President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Civil Rights Act of 1964 signed Washington DC 02 July 1964 The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was the most sweeping civil rights legislation enacted since Reconstruction. Championed by President Johnson, and passed largely along sectional lines (only eight southern representatives and senators combined voted in favor of the original versions of the bill) the

Emancipation Proclamation

Black man reading newspaper by candlelight Man reading a newspaper with headline, "Presidential Proclamation, Slavery," which refers to the Jan. 1863 Emancipation Proclamation. drawing : watercolor.

Emancipation Proclamation President Abraham Lincoln Washington D.C. 01 January 1863 Initially, the Civil War between North and South was fought by the North to prevent the secession of the Southern states and preserve the Union. Even though sectional conflicts over slavery had been a major cause of the war, ending slavery was not a goal

Louisiana Purchase Treaty

First map illustrating the Louisiana Territory, 1804

The Louisiana Purchase Treaty Paris, France 30 April 1803 The Louisiana Purchase has been described as the greatest real estate deal in history. In 1803 the United States paid France $15 million for the Louisiana Territory—some 828,000 square miles of land west of the Mississippi River. The lands acquired stretched from the Mississippi River to

Zimmermann Telegram

Zimmermann headline

In 1916 Woodrow Wilson won a second term as president, in part because he promised to keep America out of the growing war in Europe. Within months, Wilson—with the support of an overwhelming majority of Americans—would renege on that pledge.  In January 1917, British code-breakers deciphered a secret telegram sent to Mexico by German Foreign Minister, Arthur

Ronald Reagan: The Evil Empire Speech

Ronald Reagan Evil Empire Speech

Speaking at the National Association of Evangelicals convention in Orlando, Florida, President Reagan lowered the temperature in the Cold War several degrees when he branded the Soviet Union an “evil empire.” The term was coined by Reagan’s chief speechwriter Anthony Dolan and represented the rhetorical side of the escalation in the geopolitical conflict. President Ronald Reagan: Evil

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