President John Tyler, portrait

John Tyler

(1790-1862)

WHO HE WAS:

John Tyler was the tenth President of the United States, who assumed office after the untimely death of President William Henry Harrison. Tyler was the first vice president to become president due to the death of his predecessor, setting a significant constitutional precedent. Known as "His Accidency," Tyler's presidency was marked by his firm belief in states' rights and strict adherence to the Constitution.

WHAT HE SAID:

"I can never consent to being dictated to."

WHY HE MATTERED:

Tyler's presidency was significant for several reasons, including his annexation of Texas, which contributed to the geopolitical shaping of the United States. His vetoes of various bills also underscored the tensions between the executive branch and Congress, particularly within his own party, setting the stage for the politics of succession and the approach of the Civil War.